Oudolf: the great and powerful

January 21, 2013 § 3 Comments

When I wasn’t sure if I was really prepared to dive into this world of gardening (and believe me there are times I still don’t quite know how I got here) I stumbled upon the gardens of designer Piet Oudolf and any uncertainty cowered at his majesty. If I could wear a garden designed by Piet Oudolf, I would. They encompass not only everything a garden should be (a wide variety of native, pollinator-friendly species, full of texture, colour and all-season interest) but everything I love about art and design and style. In his gardens the Rudbeckia become polkadots, the Achillea-soft brush strokes-and everything has been selected for what it really is physically (a texture, a shape, a colour), not for what it represents (a “beautiful” flower). For me that was really what changed things: When you divorce yourself from the idea of what the medium is supposed to be and start from a place that is more specific, deliberate and, most of all, authentic, the outcome is a design that is not only beautiful but sustainable. Piet is so particular about the plants he uses that he began to propagate his own varieties at his home nursery. His most well known garden is likely the Highline project in good ol NYC, which gets a lot of flack for supposedly being a tourist pit. Clearly those tourists have excellent taste. The featured garden is the Millennium Garden in Pensthorpe Park. It really gives you an idea of how he designs for every change in the season.
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Photo source: www.oudolf.com 

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